Skip to main content.

child neglect

Picture of Giles Bruce
The initial statistics shocked me. It turns out, I hadn’t seen anything yet.
Picture of Giles Bruce
There’s more information known about every man, woman and child in the U.S. than ever before, in digital form. Why not use that data to protect the youngest, most vulnerable members of society?
Picture of Giles Bruce
What if the United States treated child abuse and neglect as if they were deadly diseases?
Picture of Giles Bruce
Vigo County had the highest rate of child neglect investigations in the state in 2017 — 238 for every 1,000 kids, a Times analysis of child welfare data found.
Picture of Giles Bruce
Child neglect is closely tied to poverty. By focusing on individual families accused of mistreating their kids, are we letting society off the hook?
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Since the Great Recession started more than a decade ago, many Arizona families have languished as the state, facing budget shortfalls, cut services again and again. Foster care placements have swelled.  
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Children in troubled families are often destined for troubled lives — unless they get help before their brains become “hard-wired for stress.”
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Arizona has the some of the strictest guidelines in the nation for welfare benefits. Tucson mother Jessala Grijalva can usually get what she needs for herself and her three children, but she’s found some surprising exceptions.
Picture of Ryan White
That's bad news, especially given ample research that has shown how critical engaging and speaking to young children is for building brains and spurring healthy development.

Announcements

In this season of giving, you can support journalism that saves lives by making a tax-deductible contribution to the Center for Health Journalism. For 15 years, the Center has made it possible for reporters to call attention to untold stories, highlight solutions and bring communities together around common aims. In today’s difficult news environment, the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism provides critical support so that reporters can produce ambitious, game-changing projects on health and well-being. You can text to donate. No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

Got a great idea for a substantive reporting project?  Let us fund it! (And bring you to L.A. for five days of intensive training as well!)

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth