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childhood trauma

Picture of Michael Hill
"Ashanti Jones’ story was so overwhelming it made me cry during the interview — a first in my four-decade career," writes broadcast reporter Michael Hill.
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
Twenty-one years ago, a little girl named Ashley disappeared into the center of a political controversy. Though the public never knew the 8-year-old’s name, she became a symbol when a gay man sought to adopt her. Part one of a five-part series.
Picture of Giles Bruce
Child neglect is closely tied to poverty. By focusing on individual families accused of mistreating their kids, are we letting society off the hook?
Picture of Susan  Abram
Along with books and backpacks, the teens who walk through the hallways of Washington Preparatory High School in South Los Angeles also carry secrets and fear.
Picture of Mabinty Quarshie
"One of the first lessons we learned was the need for patience with survivors. We were often asking people to relive their trauma when we interviewed them and that carried a high emotional cost for families."
Picture of Jayne O'Donnell
How a reporting team overcame countless hurdles to tell a new story of how children are affected by the family violence they experience, from the time they are in utero through childhood and after.
Picture of Adia White
Years after devastating fires, many families still struggle from both the initial trauma and the aftermath of the blaze.
Picture of Jonetta Barras
The lessons I learned reporting these stories seem so basic to the work of journalism, and yet I realized I had either forgotten these fundamentals or I had compromised them too many times in the course of my career.
Picture of James  Causey
James Causey returned to his old neighborhood in Milwaukee to take a sustained look at how young people are impacted by trauma, and how a community garden is trying to buffer against that damage.
Picture of Michael Hill
Correspondent Michael Hill reported this story with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.

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