Skip to main content.

childhood trauma

Picture of Jonetta Barras
The lessons I learned reporting these stories seem so basic to the work of journalism, and yet I realized I had either forgotten these fundamentals or I had compromised them too many times in the course of my career.
Picture of James  Causey
James Causey returned to his old neighborhood in Milwaukee to take a sustained look at how young people are impacted by trauma, and how a community garden is trying to buffer against that damage.
Picture of Michael Hill
Correspondent Michael Hill reported this story with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Michael Hill
Correspondent Michael Hill reported this story with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Laura Klivans
A reporter set out to discover why trauma rates were so high in the community of Paradise, Calif. Then the deadliest wildfire in state history destroyed the town.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
The children who end up buried the deepest in the criminal justice system were often victims of extensive trauma before they played a part in killing others.
Picture of Laura Klivans
Reporter Laura Klivans followed Sabrina Hanes through her daily routine in Paradise last summer, to learn how she’s developed resilience. She caught up with Hanes after the fire to find out what happens next.
Picture of Laura Klivans
Reporter Laura Klivans visited Paradise this summer for her reporting on childhood trauma. All the places she visited have now burned down. She takes a moment to look back.
Picture of Jonathan Bullington
The team tells how they wrapped their arms around a huge story: the impact of violence on children in one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in one of the country’s most violent cities.
Picture of Laura Klivans
As many Paradise residents work to piece their lives back together they have the added weight of trauma from the Camp Fire.

Pages

Announcements

If you're a journalist with big ideas who wants your work to matter, the Center for Health Journalism invites you to apply for the all-expenses-paid National Fellowship -- five days of stimulating discussions in Los Angeles about social and health safety net issues, plus reporting and engagement grants of $2,000-$12,000 and six months of expert mentoring.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth