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Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
To protect front-line workers, emergency departments are trying new ways of seeing patients via telehealth — even when they show up in person.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Medicare reporting, once a staple of health care journalism, has largely disappeared from health and political beats. Seniors are paying the price.
Picture of Judith Mernit
The gap between African Americans and whites in controlling hypertension decreased by 58% from 2009 to 2017. Explaining why is trickier.
Picture of Giles Bruce
“It’s been a very welcoming climate to insuring children,” said Joan Alker, director of Georgetown's Center for Children and Families. “That welcome mat has been pulled back.”
Picture of Judith Solomon
Many people who should remain eligible for Medicaid — because they’re working or qualify for an exemption — will also lose coverage, says CBPP's Judith Solomon.
Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton
Federal officials told tribal leaders in January they cannot exempt Native Americans from Medicaid work requirements. Tribes strongly disagree.
Picture of John  James
Two patient advocates make a case for why patients need a stronger bill of rights to ensure they receive quality care and are more involved in care decisions.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
States such as Kentucky and Arizona are seeking to change how their Medicaid programs work through new policies that include work requirements, enrollment lockouts and increased cost sharing.
Picture of Paul Sisson

Are California hospitals doing a better job of preventing serious mistakes in the wake of a state program that issues high-profile penalties for such errors? One reporter finds reasons for doubt in the data.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Medicare wants to lower payments to doctors who prescribe more expensive drugs and give higher reimbursements to those who use more affordable ones. But the industry pushback has been fierce.

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