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EPA

Picture of Amy Roost
As a child growing up in Arvin, California, Gabriel Duarte played with his brothers in an orchard 15 feet from his family’s front door. Today he plays in a prison yard. Duarte believes these two points on his 20-year timeline are related.
Picture of Amy Roost
Three children belonging to the same set of parents, with a combined four brain malformations that doctors say are unrelated. “The doctors are wrong,” says the mother.
Picture of Sandy Mazza
The ports of LA and Long Beach together emit 100 tons of smog daily, according to air quality officials. Even more toxic chemicals are spewed by traffic, refineries and rail yards.
Picture of Barbara Laker
From harmful dust to toxic fumes, poor oversight is blamed as school repairs make the same mistakes again and again.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
At aging Philadelphia schools, asbestos is a lurking health threat to children and staff. Tests find alarming levels, even after repair work is done.
Picture of Barbara Laker
Many Philadelphia schools are incubators for illness, with environmental hazards that endanger students and hinder learning.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
At aging Philadelphia schools, asbestos is a lurking health threat to children and staff. Tests by the Inquirer and Daily News at 11 schools found alarming levels of fibers in settled dust, even after repair work was done.
Picture of Georges Benjamin
The Clean Air Act’s impact has been greatest on those who live next to industry and highways, where toxic emissions are highest. Such “fence-line communities” typically harbor poorer people and minorities.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
Earlier this year, the EPA rejected a long-running petition to ban chlorpyrifos, which poses serious health risks to young children. But the health threats go way beyond chlorpyrifos, a leading researcher says.

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