Skip to main content.

health outcomes

Picture of SJ Black
In 2017, Mendocino County voters voted for a special sales tax to improve mental health services. Is it making a difference yet?
Picture of Suzanne Bohan
The Neighborhood Atlas gives journalists an intriguing new tool to visualize how social advantages vary across cities and regions.
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
Mike Hixenbaugh shares how he and Charlie Ornstein exposed the unusually high rate of deaths and complications at one of the country’s best known heart transplant programs.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
Children living in low-opportunity neighborhoods were four times more likely to visit acute care in a year compared with those in the highest-opportunity hoods, a recent study found.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
Social advantages are tied more sleep and better quality sleep, says Lauren Hale, who has found differences in sleep patterns among disadvantaged kids as young as 3.
Picture of Francisco Castro
Susana Castro’s arms are deformed, bruised and mangled. At 67-year-old native of Mexico City has suffered from diabetes since she was 40. She now requires three hours of dialysis treatment every third day, or else she will die.
Picture of Scott  Anderson
Stories of undiagnosed PTSD among Hmong and Vietnamese American refugees are common in some California communities. What can their experiences tell us about future health impacts facing incoming Syrian refugees?
Picture of Laura Klivans
Within California, there is an incredible variation in childhood adversity scores, from lows in San Francisco County to highs in Butte County.
Picture of SJ Black
Mendocino County has some of the highest rates of suicide and drug-related deaths in the state of California. Will a recently approved tax to fund mental health care in the county effectively address the problem?
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. Other stories in the series include: Dear Cleveland: To learn, you first have to listen

Pages

Announcements

If you're a journalist with big ideas who wants your work to matter, the Center for Health Journalism invites you to apply for the all-expenses-paid National Fellowship -- five days of stimulating discussions in Los Angeles about social and health safety net issues, plus reporting and engagement grants of $2,000-$12,000 and six months of expert mentoring.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth