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opioid epidemic

Picture of Fran Smith
A new study reveals just how often teens and young adults receive opioid prescriptions in emergency rooms, even as the crisis of addiction has exploded.
Picture of Judith Mernit
Harm reduction seeks not to shame people who use drugs into giving them up, but simply to provide them with the tools and support to improve their health.
Picture of Ed Williams
In states such as New Mexico, many kids are put into treatment foster care who should never be there. The programs, run by private companies, vary widely in quality and safety from state to state.
Picture of Jill Replogle
Momentum is building to get emergency departments to play a bigger role in stemming the epidemic.
Picture of Jill Replogle
"We are overreacting to the need to lower opioid prescribing by punishing patients," says Dr. Kelly Pfeifer.
Picture of Jill Replogle
In Los Angeles County, the rate of deadly overdoses is much lower than the national rate. Why?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The opioid epidemic has given rise to an illicit gold rush as patient brokers and treatment centers profit off desperate addicts, funneling them to shoddy treatment centers and fraudulent “sober” homes at a profit of thousands per head.
Picture of Jill Replogle
Orange County has the second highest number of opioid-related deaths in the state after Los Angeles, and the epidemic is hitting hardest among people in their golden years.
Picture of Amy DePaul

Homelessness is a health crisis, and the clock is ticking. With homeless life expectancy between 42 and 52, and half of the nation's homeless at least 50, it's not surprising that Orange and several other California counties have seen a dramatic rise in homeless deaths in recent years.

Picture of Chinyere Amobi
Reporters Kameel Stanley and Ed Williams discuss ethics in journalism, with a focus on communities in crisis. They emphasize how taking the time to understand a community can lead to more compelling reporting.

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