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reporting lessons

Picture of Susan  Abram
Find the people who can tell the story. Scrutinize death records. Isolate the levers that can create change.
Picture of Mabinty Quarshie
"One of the first lessons we learned was the need for patience with survivors. We were often asking people to relive their trauma when we interviewed them and that carried a high emotional cost for families."
Picture of Teresa Sforza
What happens to the growing number of drug-exposed babies? Answers "proved maddeningly difficult to tease out — much harder than we expected," writes reporter Teri Sforza.
Picture of Jayne O'Donnell
How a reporting team overcame countless hurdles to tell a new story of how children are affected by the family violence they experience, from the time they are in utero through childhood and after.
Picture of Edgar Avila
What happens when a poorer, unincorporated section of Sonoma is annexed by a wealthier neighboring city? Two editors share what they learned from telling stories of how annexation is impacting a community's health.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
"The biggest thing I learned about people who were reluctant to talk: Emotion affects how people talk about their health, so hearing what they have to say in person matters a great deal."
Picture of Sara Arthurs
While the Associated Press started advising reporters to avoid the word “commit” when covering suicide several years ago, many journalists and the public have yet to embrace the shift in language.
Picture of Judith Garber
A recent CNN story about an insurer denying coverage for proton beam therapy is a classic case of the media hyping an unproven, costly treatment.
Picture of Suzanne Hurt
Among the key takeaways: "Establish your credibility early and often with all of your potential sources."
Picture of Joe Rubin
An investigation into a Sacramento gun range ultimately spurred new legislation to better protect workers from lead poisoning.

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