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reporting lessons

Picture of Ryan White

“One important thing is to find your advocate,” veteran reporter John Gonzales told fellow journalists this week. “You got to find someone who is going to be there for you when you’re having trouble with access.”

Picture of Ryan White

Two journalists, a doctor and a nonprofit leader offer tips and context for how to tell urgent stories from underserved communities in the midst of the ongoing Obamacare rollout.

Picture of William Heisel

Let's say you asked for data during the early stages of reporting, but the agency in question told you, "Tough luck." Contributor William Heisel offers tips on how to fill an empty spreadsheet with pluck and will.

Picture of William Heisel

If you have a story that needs to be told, don't wait for a huge attachment to show up in your inbox. Hunt for the data that will help you tell your story. And keep in mind that a data expert can be an invaluable guide along the way.

Picture of Bob  Ortega

It started as a series of reports on the dangers Latino children face when they're not placed in car seats. It bloomed into a full-scale public awareness campaign. Here’s how one dogged reporter made it happen.

Picture of Avishay Artsy

KCRW reporter Avishay Artsy set out to report on ethnic disparities in cancer outcomes. After originally planning on covering three groups, he found he was able to tell more compelling stories by narrowing his focus to African-Americans and colon cancer.

Picture of Ana Ibarra

For her three-part series on the health effects of rising violent crime in Merced County, reporter Ana Ibarra interviewed victims and family members struggling with pain and raw emotion. Here she shares a few of the reporting lessons she learned along the way.

Picture of William Heisel

Earlier in my career, I thought I needed “big data” to take my reporting to the next level. But I didn't understand at the time that truly big data was beyond my grasp. Most reporters don't need to manipulate such huge datasets to carry out smart, data-driven journalism.

Picture of Leila  Day

“In many African American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed.” That was the beginning of the host intro for my radio series on mental health care within African American communities, and a focus sentence that led me throughout my reporting.

Picture of William Heisel

I experienced a crushing failure as an investigative reporter that I hope none of you ever have to experience. But I learned some important lessons along the way, including the need to focus my questions, narrow the scope, and embrace imperfect data.

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