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reporting lessons

Picture of Momo Chang

After months of reporting on immigrants' experiences in enrolling for health coverage, reporter Momo Chang still didn't have the long cover story she'd envisioned. But she stayed flexible and ended up with a compact news story that focused on a single facet of immigrant enrollment.

Picture of Na Li

As the number of California Medicaid enrollees signing up for coverage has grown, the number of doctors hasn't always been able to meet the demand for care. The problem has been especially acute among Chinese-Americans, many of whom struggle to find physicians willing to see them.

Picture of William Heisel

A masterful five-part series from the Charlotte Observer finds North Carolina's medical examiner system is rife with inaccurate death rulings, allowing killers to go free and leaving dangers unadressed. The series offers three key lessons for fellow reporters.

Picture of Anthony Advincula

Immigration can be such a polarizing and delicate topic, with many people not comfortable talking about it. After nearly a year of reporting on the effects of trauma on the children of deported parents, I found some lessons and experiences have stayed with me.

Picture of William Heisel

When Gary Schwitzer recently announced funding had run out for Health News Review, it caused considerable angst among health reporters. Here's a look back at some key lessons that have emerged from Schwitzer's enterprise, which has made health journalism better.

Picture of Sierra Crane-Murdoch

A reporting trip that set out to investigate the causes behind a mysterious childhood cancer cluster turned into a valuable lesson in embracing a truer kind of complexity — not the twists and turns of a mystery novel’s plot, but the unpredictable emotions that guide real people’s lives.

Picture of Johanes Rosello

Reporter Johanes Roselló spent four months interviewing families who’d been affected by the deportation of a father or spouse. Their stories were heartbreaking, frustrating and inspiring. Here are some lessons and suggestions for others considering similar projects.

Picture of William Heisel

It pays to heed incremental advances in health research and to learn from what doesn't work in reporting projects. And don't forget to stay positive on the future of health journalism. Contributor William Heisel shares more takeaways from Health Journalism 2014 in part two of his two-part series.

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