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Tammie Smith

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Recent developments in Richmond, Va., made a story looking at how where you live affects your health a timely endeavor. Through the lens of housing projects in the city's East End, Tammie Smith explains how she reported that residents there have a lower life expectancy than other Richmonders.

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East End residents want to improve the health in their community. Their key priorities are parental involvement, workforce development, and mental health and well-being.

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Both socioeconomic and public health cases can be made for dismantling the projects. People who live in Richmond, Va.'s, public housing for the duration of their lives are more likely to develop more illness and die younger than residents of other neighborhoods in the region.

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Richmond, Va.'s, communities differ vastly in the resources available for residents to pursue good health, and the result is a 12-year or more gap in average life expectancy in neighborhoods just miles apart.

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