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teen birth rates

Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Mackenzie Mays is a reporter for the Fresno Bee. Her series on teen pregnancy and sex education was done as a fellow with the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism....
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Half of California’s 10 counties with the highest teenage birth rates are in the Central Valley, despite statewide record lows in teen births. Even so, the Valley lacks programs that help boys understand the responsibilities of sex and parenthood.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
The neighborhood a child grows up in may be the biggest contributor to teen pregnancy rates. And one way to reduce the number of teen pregnancies is to provide structure, like after-school activities, to teens in needy neighborhoods.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Before the California Healthy Youth Act went into effect last year, Fresno Unified was one of a few school districts that didn’t teach comprehensive sex education and pushback against such lessons remains.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
While U.S. teen birth rates have continued to decrease across all races and ethnicities, disparities persist. In 2014, nearly 75 percent of the teen births in Fresno County California were to Hispanic mothers.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
For years, some school districts in California's Central Valley have been reluctant to teach comprehensive sex education. Worse, the valley's pregnancy and STD rates are some of the state's highest.

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