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In 2002, when her two-month-old daughter Jayden developed a fever, Jillian Lugo just thought her baby was getting her first cold. Little did she know that Jayden had contracted valley fever. Here's what happened next.

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Having another chronic disease like diabetes, arthritis or cancer may increase the risk of dying from valley fever, a new study suggests.

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Scientists researching a vaccine for valley fever take different scientific approaches to their work. Some have been stymied by a lack of funding for their work.

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There are arguments for developing a valley fever vaccine, but it can’t happen without a breakthrough in research — or more public funding.

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After years of promising developments, the effort to produce a valley fever vaccine was all but terminated because of a lack of funding and industry interest. Yet some still hope to see a vaccine on the market.

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