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I've been meaning to write about a great Aug. 9 Denver Post article I read while on a trip to that city.

Reporter Karen Augé examined the controversial health policy issues surrounding doctor-owned hospitals in the wake of a death of a young woman at Colorado Orthopaedic and Surgical Hospital.

Here's how she opens the story:

This post discusses David Sklar's memoir about his mid-life search for meaning and return to a village in rural Mexico where he had learned to become a doctor decades earlier.

It’s been five years since I started navigating the waters of social
media. I was trying to get a feel for what others were seeing in
MySpace, so I joined it and I soon joined Facebook too. Flickr,
YouTube, LinkedIn, Twitter and other sites were part of the plethora of
social media destinations I visited periodically. They all had one
thing in common: they allowed me to socialize and share with others
online.

If Congress and President Barack Obama decide the responsibility for health insurance falls on the shoulders of individual Americans, all of us might want to pay more attention to what's going on now in the individual insurance market and to what's promised in the legislation. If having no insurance is considered rock-bottom, having individual insurance is the next floor up. Some call it "house insurance," thinking that by having it they won't lose their homes to pay for a catastrophic illness.

Medical malpractice cases can live or die on the testimony of an expert witness. Defense
attorneys will go after the expert's credentials with every tool in their kit.

One would think that plaintiff's attorneys suing the federal government on behalf of a
patient would make sure they had a doctor with impeccable experience ready to take the stand and bolster the patient's case.

Instead, they hired Dr. Alex T. Zakharia.

Thousands of immigrants who have lost their jobs are suffering all kind of mental disorders and they are not receiving any mental health care.

How are California's community health clinics faring amid the state's most brutal health budget cuts in decades? That's one topic that's seen little coverage recently as journalists focus on national health reform.

This story talks about how agencies working on HIV and AIDS prevention efforts in Chicago have to rely on dated records on the disease's prevalence while the Chicago Department of Public Health labors to release the latest epidemiological data.

This is a remarkable story of healing and renewal. In 1997, photographer John Trotter was taking pictures in a Sacramento neighborhood when he was viciously assaulted and nearly killed by half a dozen young men. He recovered in Sierra Gates and later returned to the facility to learn anew how to take pictures.

My four-part series, a project of the 2008 National Health Journalism Fellowship, won first place for minority issue reporting in the state's Society of Professional Journalists contest. It examined the cultural factors which prevent Navajos from receiving cancer treatment through western medicine and the "patient navigators" who are trying to bridge the divide.

"It is not often that you are aware of the revolution right while you are in the midst of it. But we are," says Alicia C. Shepard, ombudsman at National Public Radio. And with those changes come a host of challenges for journalists working in a fast-changing climate, she recently told a group of broadcasters participating in The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships.

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