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Often following a major journalistic investigation a governor or a senator or a president even will call for hearings or declare the creation of a blue ribbon panel to assess the situation and decide how to proceed.

Years can go by before a report, usually thick with euphemism and buck passing, lands on someone's desk, often a different governor or senator or president than the one who called for the assessment. Processes are "streamlined." Efficiencies are realized. Nothing really changes.

William Heisel's picture

Eleven million Americans have eating disorders. Here are tips on covering this complex disease from a veteran journalist who faced the issue in her own family.

By the time you read about the case of 9-year-old Caitlin Greenwell, unable to talk because her brain was starved of oxygen during a botched birth, you are convinced: the oversight of nurses in California is abysmal.

Her story is deep inside "When Caregivers Harm," an investigative collaboration between ProPublica and the Los Angeles Times published Sunday.

William Heisel's picture

Andrew Schneider is one of the country's most accomplished investigative journalists. His work has won not just one, but two Pulitzer Prizes, and countless other awards. I had the privilege of meeting him when both of us were finalists for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting at Harvard. My team lost. So did his.

William Heisel's picture

2007 Fellow Daisy Lin's big picture look at health care crisis in an election year was nominated for a Los Angeles Emmy.

daisylin's picture

If you, like me, were wondering how a guy like Dr. Conrad Murray, who had not bothered keeping up with his studies enough to continue his certification as a cardiologist, could become the personal physician to the King of Pop, it's instructive to look at Dr. Jagat Narula.

Most of you won't know that name, but his career illuminates the gap between what the public expects when they see "Dr." in front of a person's name and what is often the reality.

William Heisel's picture

The CDC today launched a Web-based environmental public health tracking network that could be a fantastic resource for journalists looking for stories in their state or county.

I say "could be" because right now, the system is frustratingly slow to use, even with a decent Internet connection.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

Fellows Sharon Salyer and Alejandro Dominguez's exhaustively-reported series on the mental health challenges facing Hispanics in the Pacific Northwest has won journalism prizes from the Association of Health Care Journalists, National Institute of Health Care Management, Mental Health America and the Society of Professional Journalists of the

The illegal use and sale of prescription drugs is not just a topic for Michael Jackson headlines. A fact sheet from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says that nearly 7 million Americans are addicted to prescription drugs. The DEA says that abusers get their drugs from "'doctor-shopping,' traditional drug-dealing, theft from pharmacies or homes, illicitly acquiring prescription drugs via the Internet, and from friends or relatives."

Angilee Shah's picture

Think about what it takes to obtain a medical license. Some states' licensing boards will rubber stamp a license from another state but others, like California's, require a lot of hoops.

Then consider the case of Dr. Gregory Burnham Camp, who had licenses in California (No. 34329), Ohio (35-028433), North Carolina (36156) and Massachusetts. Why so many states?

William Heisel's picture

Misadministration. When a physician has made a horrible mistake with wide-ranging ramifications, the terms "negligence," "malpractice" even "incompetence" might come to mind. Now this wonderful euphemism glides onto the scene, draping the wreckage in a filigree of blamelessness, warding off trial lawyers and investigative journalists.

William Heisel's picture

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