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Immigration reform is in the air once again - with President Obama saying the issue will be tackled next year. Join Health Dialogues as we look at what it's like for undocumented and seasonal workers to get health care under the current system, and how immigration reform could change things.

Conversation about health care reform is heating up in Washington. Here in California, we hear from health care providers, patient advocates, employers, insurers and others across the state about how they would tackle this issue.

Polly Stryker, Senior Producer on Health Dialogues

The state Inspector General’s Office will issue a report on the quality of prison medical care in California by the end of the year. It’ll include a summary of inspections at 11 state prisons. The report will help a federal judge determine when to return control of prison medical care to the state. KPCC’s Julie Small has looked over some of the preliminary scores.

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UPDATE: Rutland will be allowed to continue practicing but cannot perform surgeries or deliveries after a judge's Jan. 7 decision. Here's the Orange County Register story.

 

William Heisel's picture

In hopes of reducing the national cost of health care, the Congressional Budget Office will produce a report with options to help save money.  

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Drug-resistant infections are one of the world’s biggest emerging health problems, but they don’t seem to get much sustained media attention except when there’s an outbreak of MRSA. That’s why a new series of articles on drug resistance around the world, based on a six-month investigation by Associated Press reporters Margie Mason and Martha Mendoza, is so welcome.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

The Chinese-American community in New York City saw an increase in HIV/AIDS cases in 2007. However, the number of cases from years prior may have been inaccurate due to the lack of HIV testing. 

Rong Ziaoqing


Adriana Venegas-Chavez's picture

Dr. Earl Bradley had rooms in his pediatric practice decorated with Disney characters. Standard issue for the field.

He also had a merry-go-round and a Ferris wheel, which might be pushing the boundaries of childlike enthusiasm.

What made Bradley truly unusual, though, were the six handheld video cameras he kept. He used them, police say, to film himself molesting patients. They suspect he may have victimized more than 100 children, often bringing them into the basement of his office where he gave them toys to play with but also terrorized them.

William Heisel's picture

Maywood, Calif., has created a "culture of participation" to help solve its pollution problems, particularly contaminated water.

 

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From health disparities to depression, “food deserts” to prison medical care, the broadcast projects of our recent California Endowment Health Journalism Fellows covered a wide variety of critical health issues. Here’s a sampling of their work:

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In this webinar, we'll look at how journalists can tell urgent stories as states reopen and workers are potentially forced to choose between their health and their economic survival. Sign-up here!

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