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Using Google Maps to tell stories can be a tricky business at first, but it gets easier with practice and is a great tool for journalists covering everything from fires to public health.

That was the message from three Los Angeles Times online journalist/techies: database producer Ben Welsh, Flash producer Sean Connelley, and editorial artist Thomas Suh Lauder at a Wednesday panel for the National Health Journalism Fellowships.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

This site is my personal portfolio of articles and tips for doing watchdog reporting. www.alisonyoungreports.com

alisonyoung's picture

In 2003, Oakland, California, was one of the most dangerous cities in America. The Oakland Tribune ran a static map with thumbnail photos of victims overlayed on a map of the city. Sean Connelly, journalist and photographer, visited victims' families, but even for him, the real people involved were becoming a blur.

Angilee Shah's picture

Seeing Dr. Cleveland Enmon's alleged misdeeds, retold on the nightly news, prompts a double take. A doctor? In a life or death situation? Stole a patient's watch? And the patient was a cop?

Enmon was arraigned last week on grand theft charges in Stockton, Calif., for allegedly swiping a very pricey watch off the wrist of retired Manteca police officer Jerry Kubena.

William Heisel's picture

Our children shouldn’t live this way.

They shouldn’t have to play at contaminated abandoned industrial sites because their neighborhoods have no green space. They shouldn’t be at risk of dying before their first birthday because the color or their skin makes getting health care difficult. They shouldn’t go to schools where there is no learning and where their parents’ greatest hope is that they don’t join a gang or get attacked.

Dave Davis's picture

From the opening keynote of this week's National Health Journalism Fellowship seminar, prevention and health beyond just health care have been common themes. Today's afternoon panelists gave examples of programs that take simple, novel approaches to integrating physical activity into people's daily lives.

Take a Walk

Angilee Shah's picture

Stan Dorn, senior research associate at the Urban Institute, says that in the game of health care reform legislation, "We are in the playoffs."

The players are largely Democrats and the few Republicans who are not opposing reforms outright. Here is a roundup of the agreements and debates in Washington, D.C., as well as a few story ideas, which Dorn outlined in this morning's seminar with the National Health Journalism Fellows.

Angilee Shah's picture

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In this webinar discussion, we’ll talk about what questions journalists should ask health systems to gauge their preparedness and understand their potential decisions on rationing care. Sign-up here!

Stuck reporting from home? This webinar will focus on helping reporters find health sources and affected people online, through social platforms and digital communities. Sign-up here!

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