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From health disparities to depression, “food deserts” to prison medical care, the broadcast projects of our recent California Endowment Health Journalism Fellows covered a wide variety of critical health issues. Here’s a sampling of their work:

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

In California, food-makers and restaurants are battling backers of a tax on sugary drinks and junk food that could help decrease obesity.

 

San Francisco's public heath program, Healthy San Francisco, services nearly 47,000 uninsured patients. Some of those patients are young, educated professionals, the subject of a three-part series we are reporting. In part two, KALW's Zoe Corneli speaks with one member of Healthy San Francisco who is frustrated with the program. Her experience mirrors that of a third of participants who reported to the independent Kaiser Family Foundation that at least one aspect of getting care is more difficult now than before they joined the program.

Hepatitis C tore through Las Vegas in February 2008, prompting health officials to call for 40,000 people to be tested for the disease. With estimates of more than 100 cases stemming from the outbreak and possibly thousands of infections that went unreported, it was later declared the largest Hepatitis C outbreak in US history, putting more people at risk than all previous outbreaks combined.

 

William Heisel's picture

On Tuesday, I posted the first half of my “Top 10 list” of noteworthy health journalism. Here’s the second half. It bears repeating: this definitely isn’t a best-of list, and admittedly, it’s print-centric. There’s lots of excellent work out there that I didn’t have a chance to read or view or listen to. But the five stories below are worth reading, and learning from.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

Dr. F.D. Toms, a New Jersey doctor, found himself in a bind.

Rumors had been running around town that he had been sleeping with another man’s wife. The spurned husband, William Smith, showed up at the doctor’s office demanding to see him.

Toms panicked. Seeing Smith charging at him, Toms grabbed a container of sulphuric acid and threw it in Smith’s face. Toms said later that he thought he had grabbed a bottle of ammonia.

William Heisel's picture

ReportingonHealth’s Antidote blogger, William Heisel, recently posted his 10 favorite stories of the year. Most of them had an investigative bent. Now, it’s my turn.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

This piece -- part of my Prisons & Public Health news blog -- ran on Newsdesk.org as part of my ongoing exploration of the connection between prisoner reentry, public health and public safety.

bmyeung's picture

California’s second most expensive health and human services program, Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, was designed to help the elderly and disabled afford basic necessities. But for many older Californians it's not meeting that goal.

In the first of our two-part series, Senior Insecurity, we’ll look at how the deepest state budget cuts to SSI in a decade have impacted older disabled Californians. A growing number of them can’t afford enough food or are living on the streets. 

 

kelleyweiss's picture

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How can students head back to school in the fall without triggering new waves of sick families, teachers and staff? In this webinar, we’ll take a deeper look at what’s at stake for student learning and wellness as the pandemic continues. Sign-up here!

The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time — the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link. Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

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