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Not many reporters want to write about homeless people – and not many editors want to read about them. The subject is considered too depressing, too intractable. But there are few crises that are more important to cover – right now.

The Laotian teenager was hearing voices saying that he needed to die. He wasn't sleeping or eating. He was losing weight. And he was convinced some force was trying to push him from a second-story window.

Family counselor Jorge Ruiz Chacón follows an ancient path to healing. At Western Washington University, he learned the same techniques in college psychology courses that his grandmother taught him. He just learned them in a different way.

She was just 13 when the man tried to rape her. She got away.

He came back with a gun, she said, attacking her inside her parents' house in Cuauhtémoc, a town in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico.

Mary Agnes Carey wrote her fellowship project story about community health care patients needing specialty care.

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Two years ago, poor medical care in state prisons accounted for about one inmate death each week. A federal judge took over and the state terminated about 60 substandard physicians. That's left many prisons without enough doctors, but not the Calipatria prison about 100 miles east of San Diego. KPCC's Julie Small reports on one doctor who's quickly building the staff.

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To the Hmong, illness is often a sign that a spirit has been wronged, is seeking revenge or wants to settle a favor bestowed in the past. Laurie Udesky explores how teaching Hmong shamans more about Western medicine can help save lives.

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Anne Geggis addresses local community efforts to cut infant death rates in her fellowship project.

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Medicare Advantage plans are surging in popularity. What’s at stake for seniors in your community as private companies increasingly administer Medicare? This webinar will help cover an essential story on a program that covers 60 million Americans across the country. Sign-up here!

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