Skip to main content.

Latest from the community

I produced an eleven minute TV story on depression, focusing on new research into better understanding the neural mechanisms underlying depression, as well as current treatments, including antidepressants, transcranial magnetic stimulation and cognitive behavioral therapy, a form of talk therapy.

The number of parks, fresh food stores, bicycle and jogging paths are influencing the spread of obesity and diabetes, particularly in minority communities, according to popular and scientific literature. I am reviewing the academic work been developed in several important cities that are trying to map out obesity and to correlated its prevalence with environmental factors. Recommendations and innovative solutions to the obesity epidemic in low income communities will be of particular interest.

Related work (comming soon!)

sshakir's picture

As Congress considers a major overhaul of the U.S. health care system, Health Dialogues examines how the new state budget will affect health care closer to home. Will kids in low income families be able to get basic services? What about drug treatment programs mandated by Proposition 36? And how may where you live affect the care you'll get?

Healthy Families Long-Term Stability in Question: Find out what it's like to be a 15 year-old girl without health insurance, as Health Dialogues hears from one of nearly 80,000 children on the Healthy Families waiting list backlog.

Shuka's picture

When historians write the history of ghostwriting in U.S. medicine, they will mark Sept. 17, 2009 as pivotal.

William Heisel's picture

Here's a quick description of my fellowship project:

The working title is "Unequal care: An investigation of health-care disparities in Wisconsin." By many measures, Wisconsin residents enjoy some of the best health care in America. The state was ranked ninth in the Commonwealth Fund's 2007 State Scorecard on Health System Performance, which "assesses state variation across key dimensions of health system performance: access, quality, avoidable hospital use and costs, equity, and healthy lives."

ahall's picture

Reading some books is like feeling a cool breeze wash over you on a sun-dappled beach as waves gently lap nearby.

The whole effect is soothing, restorative, healing.

But then there are other books which grab you with an urgency the way your mother’s voice called you by your full name when you were in trouble.

Jeff Kelly Lowenstein's picture

Although gangs and gang violence have been reconceived in recent years as a public health problem requiring systemic cures---there is far less agreement on what those cures might be. While transforming the community conditions that produce gang violence is the purported goal for policy makers in Los Angeles, there is little consensus about what strategy or group of strategies are best suited to achieve this goal.

Celeste Fremon's picture

Hi all,

Here is a basic outline of my project that I’d like to share with you guys. The project is consisted of three separated stories about health issues in the Asian Community.

1. Domestic violence against seniors in the Chinese Community.

xqrong's picture

Even in his infamy, Dr. Daniel Carlat, founder of The Carlat Psychiatry Report, is popular with drug companies. Carlat was invited recently by Schering-Plough to help promote a new drug.

William Heisel's picture

The medical examiner called Dr. Bernard N. Bass with some bad news: one of his
patients had been found dead. Bass refused to sign the death certificate.

William Heisel's picture

A reporter gets a call from the hypothetical Council for Making Sick Kids Smile about an event being sponsored on an otherwise sleepy Sunday. The reporter heads out to the event, hoping for a quick local page filler, and comes back to the newsroom with a great-sounding story with quotes from a well-spoken university professor and a teary mom and a photo of a sick and smiling child holding balloons nuzzling with a baby koala bear.

What reporters in this situation rarely ask is: who founded this council and why?

William Heisel's picture

Pages

Announcements

Ace reporter Lisa Krieger of the San Jose Mercury will share how she stays on top of the story every day, and offer pro tips that will bolster your own coverage. Sign-up here!

In this webinar discussion, we’ll talk about what questions journalists should ask health systems to gauge their preparedness and understand their potential decisions on rationing care. Sign-up here!

Stuck reporting from home? This webinar will focus on helping reporters find health sources and affected people online, through social platforms and digital communities. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth