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Drug-resistant infections are one of the world’s biggest emerging health problems, but they don’t seem to get much sustained media attention except when there’s an outbreak of MRSA. That’s why a new series of articles on drug resistance around the world, based on a six-month investigation by Associated Press reporters Margie Mason and Martha Mendoza, is so welcome.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

The Chinese-American community in New York City saw an increase in HIV/AIDS cases in 2007. However, the number of cases from years prior may have been inaccurate due to the lack of HIV testing. 

Rong Ziaoqing


Adriana Venegas-Chavez's picture

Dr. Earl Bradley had rooms in his pediatric practice decorated with Disney characters. Standard issue for the field.

He also had a merry-go-round and a Ferris wheel, which might be pushing the boundaries of childlike enthusiasm.

What made Bradley truly unusual, though, were the six handheld video cameras he kept. He used them, police say, to film himself molesting patients. They suspect he may have victimized more than 100 children, often bringing them into the basement of his office where he gave them toys to play with but also terrorized them.

William Heisel's picture

Maywood, Calif., has created a "culture of participation" to help solve its pollution problems, particularly contaminated water.

 

janetwilson66@gmail.com's picture

From health disparities to depression, “food deserts” to prison medical care, the broadcast projects of our recent California Endowment Health Journalism Fellows covered a wide variety of critical health issues. Here’s a sampling of their work:

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

In California, food-makers and restaurants are battling backers of a tax on sugary drinks and junk food that could help decrease obesity.

 

San Francisco's public heath program, Healthy San Francisco, services nearly 47,000 uninsured patients. Some of those patients are young, educated professionals, the subject of a three-part series we are reporting. In part two, KALW's Zoe Corneli speaks with one member of Healthy San Francisco who is frustrated with the program. Her experience mirrors that of a third of participants who reported to the independent Kaiser Family Foundation that at least one aspect of getting care is more difficult now than before they joined the program.

Hepatitis C tore through Las Vegas in February 2008, prompting health officials to call for 40,000 people to be tested for the disease. With estimates of more than 100 cases stemming from the outbreak and possibly thousands of infections that went unreported, it was later declared the largest Hepatitis C outbreak in US history, putting more people at risk than all previous outbreaks combined.

 

William Heisel's picture

On Tuesday, I posted the first half of my “Top 10 list” of noteworthy health journalism. Here’s the second half. It bears repeating: this definitely isn’t a best-of list, and admittedly, it’s print-centric. There’s lots of excellent work out there that I didn’t have a chance to read or view or listen to. But the five stories below are worth reading, and learning from.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

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