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It started on March 20, 2006, with what I thought was a one-shot story about the health care language gap. Two and a half years later, I am still writing follow-ups (more than 40 articles in all) about the story behind the original story — the long-hidden practice of some insurers of retroactively canceling policyholders with large medical bills.

Obesity is visible — walk down the street and you bump into it. Diabetes, on the other hand, is silent and tragic. Here are tips for reporting on the links between them.

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Rural adults are older, sicker, less educated, less well paid and less likely to have health insurance than their city counterparts. Here are some great tips for covering rural health issues — and avoiding common misconceptions — from veteran health journalist and journalism professor Patricia

Patricia Thomas's picture
The best HIV/AIDS coverage goes beyond the latest statistics of how many people are infected or the publication of a new national plan. Get tips for your own HIV/AIDS reporting from a veteran science journalist.

In the Los Angeles Unified School District, the approach to special education is two-fold: Provide support and services and mix disabled children with the rest of the students. Cathy Harvey is a single mom who’s banking the system will help prepare her three special-needs sons for life in the real world.

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How access to death certificates helped one reporter get crucial medical details right in covering the potentially preventable death of a hiker.

William Heisel's picture

In 2002, health care costs, particularly for cancer treatments, were soaring for seniors in some Medicare HMOs. After negative publicity about one HMO's drastic increase in chemotherapy copayments, the HMO agreed to reduce the cost to make it more affordable for patients.

Barbara Feder Ostrov's picture

This story is Part 13 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

The health of a city’s residents is inextricably linked to its economic vitality, according to historians, and the business and political leaders of Gary.

They said the high rates of chronic disease and infant mortality plaguing Gary did not occur in a vacuum, but resulted from 40 years of urban decline, generations of poverty and high unemployment, a lack of access to health care providers, poor lifestyle choices, historic racism and an evolution in American manufacturing that collectively have decimated industrial urban America.

 

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