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"We live in a health care desert. There's no other way to say it," on Central Coast resident said. "We are basically beholden to two major health care companies."
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-Window Rock, Ariz. (Photo: Jonathan Dineyazhe)
Why was the Navajo Nation overlooked in the face of the pandemic?
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(Photo by Christophe Archambault/AFP via Getty Images)
The patient was near death. The physician almost missed it — and warns problems like this will grow as the nation expands telehealth without improving access to technology.
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In hard-hit Navajo Nation, fighting COVID-19 means addressing a long history of underinvestment and policy neglect.
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Community volunteers join hands.
COVID-19 has underscored the disparities faced by immigrant communities in access to medical care and financial support in the state.
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(Photo by Todd Bennett/Getty Images)
A public health expert understands the pressure to play: “My college dreams were unlikely without sports.” But he calls on schools to cancel the season and honor scholarships.
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As conversations about defunding the police have sprung up across the U.S., some sexual assault survivors and advocates have joined the fray to call for changes to the system.
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Natasha Josefowitz looks beyond her balcony at the White Sands Retirement Community in La Jolla
Except for end-of-life situations, visitors largely haven’t stepped foot in facilities in months, leading to calls for access and balance. Outdoor visits are allowed but many operators do not permit them.
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Dominique Green at a Carmichael Park.
Two days before her 22nd birthday last fall, Dominique Green was at the Rocklin Police Department reporting a rape, still shaken from a violent incident with a former coworker the night before.
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A street in downtown Sacramento during California's COVID-19 stay at home order.
CapRadio healthcare reporter Sammy Caiola discusses her reporting on the intersection of race, police violence and sexual assault.
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(Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
It's hard to tell the story of how the Marshallese came to America without starting with the nuclear bombs.
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