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Health reform

Picture of Veronica Zaragovia

Radio reporter Veronica Zaragovia of KUT in Austin focused her reporting series on the rollout of the ACA in Texas, especially some of its unanticipated effects. Here she reflects on a few of the lessons she learned along the way.

Picture of SE Ruckman

When reporter S.E. Ruckman set out to tell the story of how the ACA rollout was faring among Native American communities, she found little help and few resources. But she pushed forward, and found value in persistence and serendipitous connections.

Picture of Judy  Silber

As the media takes stock of the ACA on its five-year anniversary this week, the White House on Wednesday announced a new network of more than 2,800 health care leaders tasked with leading the nation towards a more efficient, less costly model of paying for care.

Picture of Ryan White

The old system of paying for health care may be broken, but is the future finally knocking on the door? And if so, what kinds of health care innovations will lead us forward to the promised land of lower costs and quality care? Our recent webinar took up these questions and more.

Picture of Judy  Silber

At the Native American Health Center in East Oakland, health reform has pushed clinic staff to experiment with new ways of delivering care. But changes in the way care is reimbursed and increased competition for patients still leaves clinic leaders nervous about longterm survival.

Picture of Ryan White

The 2015 California Health Journalism Fellowship kicked off with a wide-ranging conversation between Gerald Kominski of UCLA's Center for Health Policy Research and Anna Gorman of Kaiser Health News on the past and future of health reform.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Geographic boundaries can have a big impact on health insurance options, particularly for people living in rural regions. Rural residents tend to fare better on premiums and choices when their area is grouped with an urban neighbor.

Picture of Judy  Silber

At La Clínica de la Raza in Northern California, the surge of new Medicaid enrollees has made it difficult for the clinic to meet the demand for care. But the need to make the most of limited resources has also led the organization to adopt new innovations, such as the "morning huddle."

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

As Medicare makes a big push towards paying providers based on value rather than volume over the next few years, Accountable Care Organizations will be expected to start making good on their promise to cut costs and improve quality of care. But so far, their track record has been rather mixed.

Picture of Judy  Silber

For La Clínica de la Raza, long a source of care for a diverse Oakland community, the ACA has increased the clinic's share of insured patients. But financial pressures are still a constant reality, and the problem will worsen dramatically if federal funding isn't renewed.

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In this webinar, two of the country’s leading health care policy reporters will give fellow reporters a behind-the-scenes look at how they track news developments, ferret out original stories and stay on top of their beat every day. Sign up here!

Want to improve your data journalism skills?  Apply now for the 2018 Data Fellowship -- four all-expenses-paid days of training on data acquisition, analysis and visualization, plus a $2,000-$4,000  reporting grant and six months of expert mentoring.  Dates:  October 17-20. Deadline: August 27 for California journalists, Sept. 7 for journalists from other states

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