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Health reform

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

People with insurance are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with a chronic condition than uninsured people. That means that as the number of insured grows, the health system will have to cope with an influx of patients newly diagnosed with conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

There’s no question that prescription drug prices are skyrocketing in the United States, and consumers aren’t happy about it. What’s more complicated, though, is understanding the complexities of the issue and reporting on what those soaring prices mean for consumers.

Picture of Ryan White

Programs that offer public health coverage to kids are crucial to boosting the number of insured kids, but they're often not enough. Research suggests that parents' insurance status is a really strong predictor of whether their kids are covered. Policy wonks call it the "welcome mat effect."

Picture of Michael  Hochman

Obamacare has strongly encouraged the creation of accountable care organizations, which focus on coordinating patient care so that, in theory, wasteful practices are eliminated and money is saved. But the early results have been mixed.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Is health insurance ripe for disruption by newer, tech-savvy market players? Oscar, a newcomer to the California health insurance exchange, certainly hopes so, and has the market valuation to back it up. But will the company's growth and innovation largely be limited to tech-savvy millennials?

Picture of Daniel Chang

Despite the numbers of Floridians stranded in a health policy no man’s land – earning too much for Medicaid but not enough for subsidies – the “coverage gap” was getting little attention from policymakers and media. A reporter at the Miami Herald set out to change that, by telling their stories.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

The headlines have recently been dominated by talk of health insurers merging, but it's really part of a broader consolidation trend taking place in health care. Health policy expert Paul Ginsburg explains what's at stake when hospitals and physician groups combine, and how California is different.

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

When LA Times reporter Soumya Karlamangla started looking into health care policies affecting immigrants, she had no idea how fast the California policy landscape was about to change. Reflecting on her reporting journey over the past year, Karlamangla offers key tips for staying ahead of the story.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

From hospital systems to pharmacies, this summer’s health headlines have been filled with tales of consolidation. And no where has the “merger mania” been more evident than the insurance sector. Health policy expert Paul Ginsburg helps us break down the trend in this Q&A.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Tradeoffs are a recurring theme when it comes to Obamacare plans — lower premiums often come with a smaller range of doctors to choose from, as a new database bears out. But as earlier research has shown, the relation between the size of physician networks and quality of care is, well, complicated.

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