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Health reform

Picture of Lisa Aliferis
This week, we caught up with Lisa Aliferis, senior communications officer for California Health Care Foundation’s High Value Care Team, and former health editor of KQED’s State of Health. Here are her top morning reads.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are merely the latest in a long line of American politicians who have cast aspersions on the Canadian health care system. Here's what they don't get.
Picture of Dan  Gorenstein
This week, we caught up with Dan Gorenstein, senior reporter for Marketplace’s Health Desk. Here are his top morning health news reads.
Picture of Ryan White
A program that creates market incentives to encourage drug makers to target rare pediatric diseases seemed like good policy at first. But evidence of the program's effectiveness is missing.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
What's known as the "public option" has been given a fresh push by Clinton's campaign and the Democratic Party this year. But while the Obamacare problems it seeks to address are real, it's an unlikely solution.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Too often, people experience death in ways deeply at odds with how they'd wish to live out their final days. In a recent webinar, a policy expert and journalist shared ideas for how the U.S. healthcare system navigates the end of life.
Picture of Steven Findlay
High levels of flux in the Obamacare exchanges make it a tough story to cover. Veteran observer Steven Findlay breaks down some of the key trends and offers reporters advice on how to make sense of the confusion.
Picture of Charles Ornstein
Here we check in with prominent health journalists and experts to see what sites, newsletters and social media feeds they turn to first every morning. This week, we caught up with Charles Ornstein, senior reporter for ProPublica.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The health insurance co-ops created under Obamacare have largely turned out to be a massive failure. How did so many co-ops run aground so quickly? A look at their short, troubled history.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

In covering the health care workforce beat, just reporting a simple number detailing the size of provider shortages or surpluses can be very misleading, explains researcher Susan Skillman in this tip sheet.

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