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Kate Benson's blog posts

posted 08/27/2013

A few weeks ago Slate writer Brian Palmer accused New York Times writer Jane Brody of using a red herring for a lede and promoting a theory that he believes is not factually substantiated. But, did he then do the same?

posted 02/19/2013

Reporting on evidence-based medicine is tricky. Interviewing outside researchers who study the treatment being examined can clarify issues regarding suitability and efficacy and help reporters avoid any spin about the results.

posted 12/19/2012

The psychiatric world is close to receiving an updated version of their “Bible.” Officially known as the DSM 5 this tome, published by the Association of Psychiatrists, under goes revision every couple of decades often accompanied by contentious issues and rancor.

posted 10/24/2012

The Boy Scouts of America are in trouble – to say the least. But, do the boy scouts who were molested and abused have even more far reaching troubles?  After all, according to files released by the organization, many of the child abusers were not prosecuted, their misdeeds covered up for years.  The

posted 09/12/2012

Are many journalists so attuned to the study of lifestyle factors fueling the rise of cancer, heart disease and diabetes that infectious disease flew under the radar?

posted 05/10/2012

At this month's AHCJ convention, blogger Sonya Collins tells us "speaker after speaker reminded us that we medical journalists shouldn’t lead with the numbers that quantify the reach of a disease or its cost to taxpayers.  We should lead with the face of someone who lives with that condition. Show our readers that she’s just like them."

She goes on to give a wonderful example of how stigma can be reduced through good storytelling.

But what if the stigma begins in part with journalists?

posted 04/15/2012

In an era of “modern” medicine, it sometimes seems as if many of the biggies have been knocked out compared to centuries past. The previously untreatable has become treatable and in many cases preventable. With knowledge can come lower societal costs as well as health care cost containment.

posted 03/09/2012

Contacting outside sources placed one journalist's article head and shoulders above the rest

posted 01/19/2012

What happens in our society when whistleblowers are ignored? Should we ignore stories that cannot be conveniently packaged as "sound bite" material?

posted 09/02/2011

Moving beyond sensationalism to providing balance as well as reliable, accurate facts in meaningful context can be challenging.

Kate Benson's Blog

A few weeks ago Slate writer Brian Palmer accused New York Times writer Jane Brody of using a red... more »
posted 08/27/13
Reporting on evidence-based medicine is tricky. Interviewing outside researchers who study the... more »
posted 02/19/13
The psychiatric world is close to receiving an updated version of their “Bible.” Officially known... more »
posted 12/19/12

Kate Benson's Latest Comments

Posted by bekate | Friday, 2012-10-26, 08:30
Thanks for reading my post. Former New York Times journalist David Shipler has an entire...
Posted by bekate | Tuesday, 2012-08-28, 07:45
Excellent series of posts as always. Although this issue is in some ways secondary to the point,...
Posted by bekate | Sunday, 2012-08-19, 07:14
Lynne Peeples had a good take on the health hazards of dust storms resulting from the drought....

Kate Benson's Work

Cutting edge technology may be the game changer in controversial disease.

The association of a murine retrovirus with ME/CFS appears to be no longer viable, but many of the researchers who can't find XMRV in patients still believe that other viruses are at play.