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Samantha Caiola's collaborative reports

The federal government plans to change how poverty is measured, which could bump low-income California families from health care and social welfare programs.
Esta semana se someterán a debate tres propuestas sobre la ampliación del programa Medi-Cal a los inmigrantes indocumentados. La más reciente incluye a los ancianos, que si bien representan a un sector pequeño de la población indocumentada del estado, su necesidad de recibir cuidados médicos es alta
Three proposals addressing Medi-Cal expansion to undocumented immigrants are up for debate this week. The latest includes seniors, which are a small but high-need slice of the state’s undocumented population.
Los programas de salud del condado y las clínicas comunitarias financiadas con fondos federales generalmente son la única red de seguridad a la que las personas sin cobertura tienen acceso. Pero algunas veces la enfermedad que padecen requiere de una cirugía u otro tratamiento complejo.
Many California entrepreneurs struggle to pay for insurance. But they could get a boost under Gov. Gavin Newsom’s latest proposals.
Dos propuestas para ofrecer cobertura de salud a todos los residentes indocumentados lograron superar importantes obstáculos este jueves en el capitolio estatal, aunque quizás no cuenten con el apoyo económico necesario para alcanzar a la línea de llegada.
County health programs and federally funded community clinics generally make up the safety net for people without insurance. But when an ailment requires surgery or other complex treatment, patients are forced to get creative or wait it out.
State lawmakers could be scaling back proposals to expand Medi-Cal coverage to all Californians after a budget subcommittee approved funding for only undocumented young adults and seniors.
Gov. Gavin Newsom says he’s committed to universal health care goals, but some advocates say his revised budget proposal falls far short.
While comprehensive care is elusive for the undocumented in all California counties, where a person lives can make all the difference in whether care is available outside of ERs.

Samantha Caiola's Blog

Reporter Rachel Crosby was relaxing at home when she caught wind of the festival shooting on... more »
posted 04/18/18
Dealing with students’ childhood trauma may improve classroom behavior and attendance rates — at... more »
posted 03/21/18
In rural Northern California counties, people tend to live miles from help. They may be too sick... more »
posted 03/15/18

Samantha Caiola's Work

CapRadio’s health reporter Sammy Caiola spent six months exploring the reasons behind the high suicide rate in rural Amador County. She shares how community engagement aided her reporting.
This story was produced as a project for the 2018 California Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC Annenberg. ...
This story was produced as a project for the 2018 California Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC Annenberg. 

Collaborative Reporting

English
Uncovered California: What's Next for Millions of Uninsured?: Redefining Who Is In Poverty Could Bump Thousands From Medi-Cal
The federal government plans to change how poverty is measured, which could bump low-income... more »
Español
Esta semana se someterán a debate tres propuestas sobre la ampliación del programa Medi-Cal a los... more »