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Fellowship Story Showcase

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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Jennifer Hsu / WNYC
There is a lot of public data on maternal health and New York City hospitals. WNYC's Fred Mogul makes sense of it so families can find the best hospital for them.
Mothers in New York told WNYC about their wide range of experiences with childbirth. (Jennifer Hsu / WNYC)
New York City health officials are watching childbirth rates across the city — and trying to find ways to lower the risk for the most vulnerable group: African-American women.
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Hospital delivers more babies in a year than any other hospital in New York State. They also have some of the lowest complication rates, a distinction born from practice.
Jennifer Hsu / WNYC
There’s a safety gap in New York City hospitals that puts the lives of black women at much greater risk than white women. Experts say better hospital culture can reduce the risks.
Central High School students sold water bottles to raise money for water filtration and bottle-filling stations.
Data recently made public by Philadelphia's school district showed that nearly 15 percent of water samples taken from school drinking water outlets had lead higher than the legal level for home tap water. This needs to change.
When Jalen was 2, his pediatrician discovered he had an alarming blood lead level.
In the wake of reporting from two National Fellows, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said Monday that the city will begin to enforce a four-year-old law that requires landlords to certify that their properties are lead-safe before renting to families with young kids.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
With more than 90 percent of Philadelphia homes built before the nation's 1978 lead-paint ban, the city struggles to eradicate childhood lead poisoning and ranks among the top U.S. cities for children at risk.
Will Camargo
Children who were poisoned by lead are now suffering the effects as young adults. The question many parents are asking is how will the school system help these students?
Christopher Brown
While the government banned lead-based paint in 1978, more than 75 percent of houses in Chicago were built before 1970, affecting children with lead poisoning.
Nicole Hamp is a pediatrician who says Illinois's Early Intervention program can help families maximize a lead-affected child.
Children who have been exposed to lead poisoning have access to the Early intervention program that offers resources ranging from speech therapy to nutrition services.

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