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Suicides in teen boys spike: ‘We’re seeing something new among males’

The suicide rate for boys ages 15 to 19 jumped dramatically in 2017, reaching its highest point in a generation.
A sign points the way to the emergency room at Palomar Medical Center Escondido.

San Diego Hospitals Challenged by Jump in ER Use

ER visits rose 18% from 2012 to 2017, posing financial and operational difficulties.
Raena Granberry, shown here with her daughter, previously lost a child who was born premature.

How one reporter made an old statistic about black infant mortality new and urgent

Black babies in the U.S. are twice as likely to die as white babies in their first year. When I heard this decades-old statistic for the first time, it me like a slap to the face.
stock photo

Health Media Jobs & Opportunities: Apply to be health editor at SheKnows.com

SHE Media is looking for an experienced editor to join their team in New York, overseeing all health and wellness coverage on SheKnows.com.
(Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images)

Kaiser says it halved the hypertension gap between blacks and whites over a decade — but how?

The gap between African Americans and whites in controlling hypertension decreased by 58% from 2009 to 2017. Explaining why is trickier.
Dr. Raquel Figueras, a pediatrician, listens to toddler Siulaidali Morales’ heart and lungs during a medical exam.

Community Health Centers were lifesavers after the hurricane, but government didn’t count on them

Three days after Hurricane María, Isolina Miranda stared in disbelief at what was left of the two-story building where a community health center once stood in the heart of San Lorenzo, a town in Puerto Rico.
An undocumented Fresno woman who gave her name as "Raquel" walks outside her home.

Undocumented immigrants go without health care for fear of public charge proposal

The Trump administration’s proposal to broaden the definition of ‘public charge’; or a burden on U.S. taxpayers, has already stopped many immigrants from using public health services for fear that such use will block them from a green card.
San Leandro, Calif., resident Bella Comelo, and her husband, Ernest, have written their living wills.

An India-West Special Report: As Death Approaches, Older Indian Americans Unprepared for the End

Discomfort with end-of-life care discussions is not uncommon among many older immigrants in the United States.

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