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Tell us: How do you get food where you live in Louisville?

Fellowship Story Showcase

Tell us: How do you get food where you live in Louisville?

Picture of Bailey Loosemore

The Courier Journal has received support from the University of Southern California's Center for Health Journalism to embark on a project about food insecurity in Louisville, with the goal of presenting solutions that fit our community.

Other stories in this series include:

Tell us: How do you get food where you live in Louisville?

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Shelby Park's Save-A-Lot closed with little warning to neighbors

Sorry, we're closed: How everyone is hurt when grocery stores shut down

In 30 seconds: What you should know about food deserts in Louisville

Tuition or food? How college kids use food pantries to help food insecurity

Louisville has a fresh food problem. Can we fix it?

'A real crisis in Louisville': Readers respond to food desert series

How a low-income Louisville neighborhood became a fresh food oasis

How can cities end food deserts? Here are 4 solutions that worked

Louisville families shouldn't be struggling to find fresh food

No grocery store in your neighborhood? Join forces to create one

People can't get to a grocery store easily. So these volunteers are driving them

Would you shop at a mobile grocery store? Kroger is betting on it 

Where You Live Determines How Much Your Eggs Cost at Kroger

How some residents get their food in Louisville's food deserts

Louisville's vacant grocery stores find new tenants. But they won't sell food

How these Louisville companies are helping employees buy affordable fresh produce

Can indoor farming fix food deserts? These Louisville students think so

Kentucky's hunger initiative earns national attention. But thousands still need food

Downtown Louisville is growing rapidly. So why doesn't it have a grocery store?

Is crime driving grocery stores out of Louisville's low-income communities?

Louisville kids are still at risk for lead poisoning. Here's how healthy eating can help

When will downtown Louisville get a grocery store? Here's what we found

Everything you need to know about Kroger's mobile grocery store in Louisville

Kroger's mobile market brings fresh food to Louisville neighborhoods without access

(Photo: Alton Strupp/Courier Journal)
(Photo: Alton Strupp/Courier Journal)
Courier Journal
Monday, October 1, 2018

Over the past decade, study after study has shown that thousands of people who live within certain areas of Louisville don't have adequate access to food.

Grocery stores are few and far between in communities like west and south Louisville. And if residents there don't want to do all their shopping at small convenience or discount stores, they often have to spend extra time and money to travel to supermarkets outside their neighborhoods.

TELL US HOW YOU GET FOOD FOR YOUR FAMILY (Google form)

The gaps in access can deepen financial hardships for already struggling families and can lead to a variety of health disorders that lower life expectancy.

According to the 2017 Louisville Metro Health Equity Report, people living in west Louisville have an average life expectancy of about 70 years — 12 years lower than the average life expectancy for people living in the city's far east end.

Nonprofits have attempted to address the disparity by creating innovative produce marketscommunity gardens and even a frozen foods pop-up shop, while metro leaders have worked with grocery operators to keep stores in the under-served areas.

But the gaps persist — and we want to help offer solutions.

The Courier Journal has received support from the University of Southern California's Center for Health Journalism to embark on a project about food insecurity in Louisville, with the goal of presenting solutions that fit our community.

As part of that project, we've launched a survey to learn about individual residents' grocery shopping habits.

Is it hard to for you to get food where you live? What makes it easy or difficult? We want to know.

You can help us make sense of what's going on in our community by answering thequestions below at courier-journal.com. We won't publish any information you share without your permission.

Have a question or just want to talk? Email bloosemore@courier-journal.com or call 502-582-4646.

[This story was originally published by Courier Journal.]