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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

How do you feel? Better Choices, care are goals

This series took 6 months to prepare. 

Nursing homes in California have reaped $880 million in new funding from a 2004 state law designed to help them hire more caregivers and boost wages. But many homes did just the opposite.

Preparation is Key to Caregiving

Bianca and Michael Alexander examine the lack of healthy food options around Chicago and what that means for residents' health.

In a four-part series, Uriel Posada investigated health disparities confronting the Hispanic community in the United States. 

En una serie de cuatro partes, Uriel Posada investigo las disparidades de salud en la comunidad hispana en los Estados Unidos.

 

Part 1: What is the Current Situation in the Hispanic Community? 

Parte 1: Cual es la situacion actual en la comunidad hispana?


Part 2: Health Disparities and the Hispanic Culture

Julio Cesar Ortiz, a reporter for KMEX TV 34 (Univision) in Los Angeles, produced a three-part series that examined the effects of Alzheimer's disease on elderly Latinos. Titled "Thief of Memories," his Spanish-language series highlighted the various stages of the memory-destroying condition and presented options for families who are struggling to care for a loved one with Alzheimer's Disease.

In order to serve its increasingly multi-lingual population, New York State requires interpretation services in all hospitals. But when caring for immigrants, the language barrier is just one of a myriad of issues health providers grapple with. Even though there is no statewide mandate for cultural sensitivity, many doctors say it's become a necessary instrument in providing medical care for the city's immigrant population.

One out of four New Yorkers doesn't speak or understand complex sentences in English. But at some point in their lives, every one of them will need to see a doctor. Language barriers can result in misdiagnoses, medication errors, and potentially fatal mistakes that are costly for both patients and providers. For this reason, hospitals in New York are required to provide "meaningful language access" to all patients. But in a city where more than 140 different languages are spoken, this is no easy task.

Alameda County's path-breaking new mental-health court seeks to help youth with psychiatric problems who have broken the law.

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