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Fellowship Story Showcase

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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Latino Teens Under the Shadow of Suicide

What's being done to prevent suicide among Latino teens in Georgia? Linda Perez investigates for MundoHispanico.

A flood of ill health

The construction of a dam near an Indian reservation on the Missouri River forced residents to less fertile land and put an end to their farming habits. Since then, American Indians have experienced a lack of nutrition, leading to diabetes, hypertension and obesity.

La salud mental de niños y jóvenes latinos es afectada por la violencia y el proceso de reunificación familiar

Vulnerable Minds: The mental health of Latino children and youth affected by violence and the process of family reunification.

Most services for low-income intact for now

While funding for California's welfare programs has seen a steady decline over the past few decades, the state's financial crisis may mean even more severe cutbacks. Many who depend on these programs may face homelessness and illness as a result.

Center a vital cog in efforts to serve area’s mentally ill

While other social services are facing budget cuts, the funding to serve Del Norte County’s mentally ill population seems relatively secure.

Some local entrepreneurs have been stunned because they failed to meet all the rules for the small-business tax credits in last year's highly vaunted federal health care law to help cover their health care costs.

Despite their disappointment, they're hopeful that another part of the law, which kicks in three years from now, is well worth waiting for.

Journalist Yesenia Amaro examines how some small businesses will cope with health reform as their health costs for workers continue to soar.

Several national, statewide studies show similar results

Janna Rodriguez, one of the owners of J&R Tacos in Merced, wants to learn more about the specific provisions in the federal health care law designed to help small businesses such as hers. Her restaurant, which opened almost five years ago, employs eight part-time employees — and none of them receive health care benefits.

California's Central Valley has by far the highest agricultural production in the country. But those who work the land often don't benefit from the fresh fruits and vegetables they harvest.

When the Chicago City Council last week passed an ordinance to reduce emissions from construction equipment working on city jobs, it touched on a larger problem: harmful amounts of diesel exhaust in the city. Journalist Kari Lydersen found troubling emission levels in some neighborhoods.

 

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Did breaking news interfere with your intention to apply by last Friday's deadline for the 2019 California Fellowship, which provides $1,000 reporting grants and six months of expert mentoring to 20 journalists, plus community engagement grants of up to $2,000, plus specialized mentoring, to five?  Get in touch with us.  We may be able to extend the deadline.

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