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Fellowship Story Showcase

Explore our 1637 stories.

As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

NBC33TV anchor Valentina Wilson takes a look at a possible obesity virus. Looking at a pathogen called AD-36, may help doctors find the cause of some cases of obesity and help find a way to combat the growing obesity problem in Louisiana.

Wisconsin has one of the highest rate of deaths for African-American newborns in the nation. In a special, three-part series produced by reporter Shamane Mills, the factors behind this devastating trend are examined.

Julie Small's in-depth investigation of dangerously poor health care in California's prisons finds some progress after a lawsuit put prison health in the hands of a federal receiver, but much more needs to be done.

The growing number of aging baby boomers reaching 60 is putting a strain on California's health care services aimed at helping low-income citizens.

SURVIVING DIABETES
These stories on the challenges of managing diabetes were reported with the assistance of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, administered by the USC Annenberg School for Communication. The Express-News and KWEX-TV were selected by the program in 2008 to report on diabetes and obesity, with a particular focus on the impact on Hispanic communities.

These stories on the challenges of managing diabetes were reported with the assistance of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, administered by the USC Annenberg School for Communication. The Express-News and KWEX-TV were selected by the program in 2008 to repo

Although teen suicide attempts have declined gradually since the 1990s, death by suicide has risen 8 percent among teenagers, according to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, it’s the third leading cause of death for teens between the ages of 15 and 19. While each suicide is a unique story, there is a common thread: More than 90 percent of teens who kill themselves show signs of major depression or another mental illness in the year prior to their deaths.

What defines a concussion? And, what are the potential effects of repeated concussions on the brain? We speak to a pair of local experts about the long- and short-term effects of concussions, the latest NFL rules changes, and the challenges to identifying when a person has suffered a concussion.

A five part series on how the city and region is emerging as a national model for public healthcare.
A five part series on how the city and region is emerging as a national model for public healthcare.

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