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One African-American family, half a century of experience in SF public schools

Fellowship Story Showcase

One African-American family, half a century of experience in SF public schools

Picture of Lee Romney

The series has received support from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of USC's Center for Health Journalism.

Other stories in this series include:

One African American family, half a century of experience in SF public schools

(Photo Credit: Lee Romney/KALW)
(Photo Credit: Lee Romney/KALW)
KALW
Thursday, January 17, 2019

Some of San Francisco’s African American families have attended public schools in the City for three generations. They share their personal stories as part of the ongoing series, “Learning while black: The fight for equity in San Francisco schools.”  

Today, we meet the Stewarts. Elsie Stewart retired a decade ago as a supervisor at the Four Seasons Clift Hotel in Union Square, where she worked for more than 40 years. Her son, Emmanuel, is an elementary school principal. And grandson Shaquill? He works in a San Francisco public school now too, while studying radio on the side. All attended traditional public schools here, and all still live in the City.

The series has received support from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism. Do you have a story idea to share? Lee wants to hear it. Reach her at lee@kalw.org.

Some of San Francisco’s African American families have attended public schools in the City for three generations. They share their personal stories as part of the ongoing series, “Learning while black: The fight for equity in San Francisco schools.”

[This story was originally published by KALW.]