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Fellowship Story Showcase

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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Marple: Add exercise to school day

To battle obesity, West Virginia Schools teachers are implementing 15 extra minutes of physical activity into each day.

One in four fifth-graders has high blood pressure and cholesterol. One in four eleven-year-olds is obese, a clear red flag for the future.

The FITNESSGRAM is a yearly test of each child's physical fitness. Body mass index is measure of fat calculated from a person's weight and height.

Wood County school helps get kids fit before they sit

How do you get kids to exercise at 7:30 in the morning? Hula hoops in the gym before school. Kate Long profiles one anti-obesity program at a West Virginia school.

Currently, more than 4,000 people of Asian descent are living with HIV/AIDS in California. But some healthcare workers say cultural values and pressures in the community often complicate dealing with the disease.

West Virginia occupies a top slot on almost every awful health ranking: diabetes, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and others.

Experts have advised West Virginia to establish statewide diabetes management programs. Dannie Cunningham can testify that they work.

One in four 11-year-olds faces high blood pressure, cholesterol, obesity

Journalist Kate Long examines the pressing problem of obesity and its link to other chronic diseases in West Virginia.

Thousands of W.Va. children headed for diabetes

West Virginia is among the top five states on just about every national chronic disease list. Journalist Kate Long investigates what's behind the state's poor showing.

Children at risk of chronic disease identified, but who follows up on care?

Every year, for 12 years, Lincoln County school nurse Pam Dice sat down and telephoned parents of kids who had what she calls "dangerous numbers."

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